Jon Oropeza

Software engineering and engineering software development teams. Mostly the people parts.


This week - A look back at the 2010s

1. A Look Back At The Last Ten Years

A decade in review in tech by Cindy Sridharan

A different format this week. I got so into this post on the 10s that all my best links of the week referenced the list of adoptions and innovations in the teens.

2. Rust

Why Rust by Dmitriy Kashitsyn

3. The Type Strikes Back

Why Our Brains See the World as "Us" versus "Them" from Scientific American

This one devolved into a low key religious war at my current shop, with all sorts of interesting undertones. Absolutes lurk on either extreme of the argument. Grass-is-always-greener thinking peppers the spectrum. Rational arguments include acceptance that there are appropriate use cases for either typing paradigm, and weight the tradeoffs between the two specific to a situation.


This week - -

1. A Look Back At The Last Ten Years

A decade in review in tech by Cindy Sridharan

A different format this week. I got so into this post on the 10s that all my best links of the week referenced the list of adoptions and innovations in the teens.

2. Rust

Why Rust by Dmitriy Kashitsyn

3. The Type Strikes Back

Why Our Brains See the World as "Us" versus "Them" from Scientific American

This one devolved into a low key religious war at my current shop, with all sorts of interesting undertones. Absolutes lurk on either extreme of the argument. Grass-is-always-greener thinking peppers the spectrum. Rational arguments include acceptance that there are appropriate use cases for either typing paradigm, and weight the tradeoffs between the two specific to a situation.


Seven For Sunday - January 5, 2020 - Data, hiring, and recapping the '10s

1. Good Thread On Microservices

2. Interesting Tech Concept

Why Now Is The Time to Be a Maker in Generative Media by Tyler Lastovich

3. Getting Your People Interested In A Core Concept

How do I get my team into observability by Charity Majors

I've been spending time thinking about a post I shared a few weeks ago, describing the three patternistic actions of a manager:

  • Information Gathering
  • Nudging
  • Decision Making

Importantly, none of which are telling people what to do. Getting people interested in something, OTOH, is - having decided that something is important - then squarely in the category of nudging.